disguise


disguise
disguise vb Disguise, cloak, mask, dissemble, camouflage are comparable when meaning to assume a dress, an ap-pearance, or an expression that conceals one's identity, intention, or true feeling.
Disguise, which basically implies an alteration in one's dress and appearance, frequently retains this implication with the added suggestion either of concealment of identity or of the assumption (as on the stage) of another identity
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escape captivity disguised as a woman

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they disguise themselves as Turks for a joke

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The term, however, may apply to a feeling, an intention, or a motive when one's words, expression, or acts imply a contrary reaction
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I disguised my impatience and suspicion of him and waited— Hudson

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however we may disguise it by veiling words we do not and cannot carry out the distinction between legislative and executive action with mathematical precision— Justice Holmes

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our author, disguised as Jonathan Oldstyle, contributed a series of letters . . . protesting with admirable chivalry against jesting at maiden ladies— Commins

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Cloak implies the assumption of something which covers and conceals identity or nature
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the appearance of goodwill cloaked a sinister intention

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intolerance and public irresponsibility cannot be cloaked in the shining armor of rectitude and righteousness— A. E. Stevenson

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Mask implies a disguise, comparable to a covering for the face or head, which prevents recognition of a thing's true character, quality, or presence
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icy spots masked by newly fallen snow

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masking with a smile the vain regrets that in their hearts arose— Morris

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his pessimism . . . became an obvious pose, an attempt to mask his porky complacence— Hicks

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Dissemble stresses simulation for the purpose of deceiving as well as disguising; it, therefore, is the preferred term when actual deception is achieved
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Ross bears, or dissembles, his disappointment better than I expected of him— Gray

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the Scripture moveth us . . . to acknowledge and confess our manifold sins and wickedness; and that we should not dissemble nor cloak them before the face of Almighty God— Book of Common Prayer

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Camouflage in its basic military use implies a disguising (as with paint, garnished nets, or foliage) that reduces the visibility or conceals the nature or location of a potential target (as a ship, a factory, or an airfield), and in its common extended use tends to imply a comparable disguising quality or element, often specifically one that tends to minimize some undesirable aspect (as of a person or his acts or attributes)
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Soulé is five feet five inches tall and . . . inclines to stoutness, but his erect bearing and quick movements tend to camouflage this— Wechsberg

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the absolute character of these dictatorships was camouflaged somewhat by an elaborate parliamentary system—C. E. Black & E. C. Helmreich

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Analogous words: conceal, *hide: *misrepresent, belie, falsify, garble: *assume, pretend, feign, counterfeit, sham, simulate, affect
Contrasted words: expose, exhibit, display, parade, flaunt (see SHOW vb): *reveal, disclose, discover, betray

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Disguise — Dis*guise (?; 232), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disguised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disguising}.] [OE. desguisen, disgisen, degisen, OF. desguisier, F. d[ e]guiser; pref. des (L. dis ) + guise. See {Guise}.] 1. To change the guise or appearance of; especially …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Disguise — Dis*guise , n. 1. A dress or exterior put on for purposes of concealment or of deception; as, persons doing unlawful acts in disguise are subject to heavy penalties. [1913 Webster] There is no passion which steals into the heart more… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disguise — [dis gīz′] vt. disguised, disguising [ME disgisen < OFr desguiser, to change costume: see DIS & GUISE] 1. to make appear, sound, etc. different from usual so as to be unrecognizable [to disguise one s voice] 2. to hide or obscure the existence …   English World dictionary

  • disguise — [n] covering, makeup for deception beard, blind, camouflage, charade, cloak, color, coloring, concealment, costume, counterfeit, cover up, dissimulation, dress, facade, face, faking, false front*, fig leaf*, front*, get up, guise, illusion, make… …   New thesaurus

  • disguise — I noun artifice, camouflage, caricature, cloak, concealment counterfeit, cover, covering, deception, deceptive covering, dissimulation, facade, faking, false appearance, false colors, false copy, false front, guise, hiding, imitation, mask,… …   Law dictionary

  • disguise — verb is spelt ise, not ize. See ise …   Modern English usage

  • disguise — ► VERB 1) alter in appearance or nature so as to conceal the identity of. 2) hide the nature or existence of (a feeling or situation). ► NOUN ▪ a means of disguising one s identity. ORIGIN Old French desguisier …   English terms dictionary

  • disguise — dis|guise1 [dısˈgaız] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: desguiser, from guise appearance ] 1.) to change someone s appearance so that people cannot recognize them disguise yourself as sb/sth ▪ Maybe you could disguise yourself as a… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • disguise — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ clever, good ▪ thin ▪ State regulation often served as a thin disguise for corruption. VERB + DISGUISE ▪ adopt …   Collocations dictionary

  • disguise — I UK [dɪsˈɡaɪz] / US verb [transitive] Word forms disguise : present tense I/you/we/they disguise he/she/it disguises present participle disguising past tense disguised past participle disguised * 1) to hide something such as your feelings or… …   English dictionary


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